Track #141: Hiding the Fact You’re Dead Again

141 Hiding the Fact You're Dead Again

Noah: Worst. Granddad. Ever.

Sadly, they did teach me the so-called “Curse of Ham” in Tennessee. The theory is that part of Noah’s curse on his son, Ham (sometimes named as his youngest, other times his middle–Noah makes Ham the middle child), turned Ham’s skin black. No, seriously. This was one of several ideas that was used to justify the enslavement of Africans well into the nineteenth century, and, according to at least one of my teachers, beyond.

Even as most scriptural justifications go (i.e., homophobia), this one’s pretty thin. Still, a lot of people believed it, and I’m pretty sure some still do.

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4 Comments

on “Track #141: Hiding the Fact You’re Dead Again
4 Comments on “Track #141: Hiding the Fact You’re Dead Again
  1. I don’t know that I’d call it a “modern day” interpretation. I know that it was presented to us as something that was used to justify the enslavement of Africans back in the day. I remember having the impression that one such teacher and/or preacher thought it justified, if not necessarily continuing to enslave Africans, then definitely having enslaved them as long as the South did. I asked a friend about this. He doesn’t recall that, so maybe I don’t remember it clearly. He went to the same religious school as me, though not to the same church.

  2. I also wonder (as does Shem above) why Shem had to house the descendants of his baby brother, Japheth. Maybe Noah knew that the youngest children are less likely to move out, and HE wasn’t going to take care of them. Poor Shem.

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